Hotel vs Hammock – I know what I would choose

Ethan Allen
 
 
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I’m spending at least one night a week away from home at the moment. So I’m going to dive into the pros and cons of wild or free camping as opposed to hotel or B&B.

HOTEL PROS

– Breakfast included
– Can watch TV
– Known quantity
– Shower
– Can just roll into bed if tired
– Can do some work in the evening if you want

BUT A HAMMOCK IS ALSO A GREAT OPTION…

Free –
The big one is that it’s free if you have the kit. I paid £75 for a last minute hotel. I know that I can probably get Airbnb for as little as £25 a night but that adds up if you’re regularly away.

 

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Amazing views –
Just wow. I found an amazing spot right by an estuary. I was really lucky with the weather (I’ll definitely be hammocking in bad weather and will blog about that too). The moon was so bright, the birds soothing me to sleep. It was simply magical.

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Clean air/ clean mind –
Just being out on your own in the forest, away from the road and people is good for the lungs and good for the soul. If a free camp goes well I feel like I’m life hacking. Doing this differently and counter-culturally and that makes me feel good too.

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Really comfy sleep –
I’m not completely there yet, but I massively see the potential in the hammock in terms of comfort. I slept pretty well actually and the main thing that kept me awake at times was over heating! I tend to weigh up the next days work, if I have a massive pitch then a hotel might be the best option, mainly because of the hot shower. I also went to bed pretty early and just read a book with my head torch until I fell asleep.

Shower hacks –
There is a beach near where I’m working that has a free shower. If you’re a member of gym then that would be the best solution. Or you can always wet wipe shower.

Flexibility –
You can just sleep anywhere. I scout out places on google maps or ask people if they know any secluded bits of woodland. In this camp I actually know the person who owns this bit of woodland, so that was a definite advantage. I recommend that you pitch up just before dark and leave as early as you can so that you reduce the chance of bumping into a dog walker or angry farmer/ woodsman.

LEAVE EARLY. LEAVE NO TRACE

This was written by Laurence who lives in England and writes the excellent blog Chasing Wilderness – article source

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